Most commonly known as an injectable to relax muscles in the face and soften lines and wrinkles, Botox has been getting some new attention from researchers as a potential treatment for osteoarthritis (OA) pain. Botox, also known as Botulinum toxin type A, is a drug made from a toxin produced from the bacterium Clostridium botulinum. The Botox injections work by weakening certain muscles or blocking particular nerves from receiving chemical signals from the brain.

While intriguing, the evidence thus far that Botox is an effective treatment for osteoarthritis pain is still yet to be proven. In preliminary studies, Botox injected into arthritic joints has seemed to improve joint function and reduce pain. One study, published in Pain Management & Rehabilitation, official scientific journal of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, examined OA treatment results in patients treated with Botox immediately following treatment as well as 6 months post-treatment; however, most studies that have been conducted with Botox for OA have been small with many lacking a control group to see if the Botox works better than a placebo.

Physicians have also made sure to bring up some points of caution. While Botox could potentially paralyze the muscles or nerves causing the pain, it could inadvertently effect other muscles needed for proper motor functioning. While Botox may have a future in the world of treating OA, the efficacy of the treatment remains a question.

If you or someone you love is suffering from OA pain and looking for new treatment options to help manage symptoms, studies are enrolling now in your local area that may help.  Research doctors are evaluating new treatment options and qualified participants may have access to potential new OA treatments.  Participants often receive care from board-certified physicians and other medical staff, and may receive compensation for time and travel expenses. To learn more about these studies and to see if you qualify CLICK HERE.